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ComfortCare Homes Wichita Blog

Quality Dementia Treatment Training Goes Beyond Basic Requirements

Friday, September 15th, 2017 6:38:02 PM
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ComfortCare Homes provides additional training in Alzheimer’s and dementia treatment to caregivers

ComfortCare Homes is dedicated to providing the highest quality memory care for our Residents in Wichita, KS. We work with seniors and their families to create a plan of care that meets their unique needs and preferences. Part of ensuring that our Residents receive expert care at all times is continuing education for our caregiving staff.

This summer, ComfortCare Homes began a rigorous training program. We partnered with local organizations to provide dementia treatment education. Our caregiving staff had the opportunity to learn about person-centered care and the importance of performing at their best. For more information about our training partners, read our blog “Learning Never Stops: Comfort Care Homes Caregivers Ongoing Education” here.

Why Dementia Treatment Training Is Important

Each member of our caregiving staff is specially chosen and trained to provide compassionate, professional senior care services for our Residents. To ensure that our caregivers continue to perform at their best, ComfortCare Homes has begun a more specialized dementia treatment training program.

These certification courses go above and beyond what is required of caregivers in Wichita, KS. For seniors with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, it is incredibly important for their caregivers to have specialized training. The nature of dementia and memory illnesses is different from other conditions because it causes major behavioral, cognitive, and memory changes.

Caregivers providing dementia care need to be skilled in responding to confused seniors, calming seniors who are agitated, and remaining patient and positive during difficult situations. As medical researchers learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and the causes of these behavioral changes, dementia treatment changes. It is essential that our caregiving staff is up to date on these changes and can implement improvements into the care they provide to our Residents.

Communicating with seniors who have dementia or Alzheimer’s is a required skill for ComfortCare Homes caregivers. Proper dementia treatment encourages non-threatening, calm communication. Often times, trying to ask questions or reason with a confused senior only causes more agitation. Because our caregivers work with Residents every day, they are able to recognize what communication techniques work for each individual senior.

Dementia treatment advancements also help our caregivers prepare for future care. Knowing how degenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s, progress allows our staff to respond to changes in our Residents’ health. Going beyond the required qualifications allows ComfortCare Homes to provide a standard of care that is above other memory care facilities.

Find out more – contact us today!

If you are searching for local dementia and Alzheimer’s care providers, consider ComfortCare Homes. You can browse our website to learn more about our services, location, and caregiving staff.

For more information about our caregiver training or senior care services provided by Comfort Care Homes, please call our office at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website: http://comfortcarehomeswichita.com/

Why I Walk – Pam Crawford

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017 2:51:46 PM
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I walk for my Father who had Parkinson’s Dementia and for my Grandmother.

My memories of my grandmother as a Pastor’s wife are full of feeding us gum and candy bars in church to keep us kids quiet. She loved to cook and believed any ailment you had was remedied by food. Every one of us grandkids knew we were loved immensely and enjoyed the twinkle in her eye and laughter as she watched us eat together as a family. Memories of picking veggies from the garden and her canning – always remember her homemade Apple Butter.

Last but not least, was her legacy to us of her beautiful crocheted blankets, tablecloths, baby hats, doilies, etc. This was my fondest memory, of watching her sit for hours to make beautiful things that made others smile. It was extremely difficult to realize she could no longer remember how to crochet. Those treasures I keep close to my heart as does my daughter now that Grandma is no longer with us.

I struggled as my Grandmother began to lose her memory over time. I knew Grandma was still there even when she could no longer live at home. When her natural inhibitions no longer worked because of this illness, it was difficult to watch. Nevertheless, we wanted her to know she was loved in any way that we could. Watching my family struggle with this illness also wasn’t easy. You can’t argue with someone with this illness and when she began to live in her past thinking it was the present, it was difficult to watch my family try to persuade her. While we all learned over time the right way to react and interact, those struggles are so real. I am comforted to know that we had each other through the entire journey with my Grandmother.

My father’s journey with Parkinson’s dementia was different and yet equally as challenging. When you know someone who was so full of life and opinions, with a contagious unique laughter who served his country and loved his God with all his heart and then…….you see loss of independence in every facet of life, you cry a bit inside each time knowing that this could be you one day.

Watching him lose his ability to get his words out, lose his strength to sing and praise in church and even eat much, it hits your heart hard. What was so sweet to watch was putting on music he loved or having musicians come to play old hymns, he could still tap his foot and use his hands to show you that it was soothing to him. Even when he couldn’t eat much, you knew a soft Reeses peanut butter cup would offer him some enjoyment and of course, we all have his love of Reese to take with us.

There is not a lot in the way of medications to truly help a person with dementia who develop behavioral challenges. It pained me to see him have to be so medicated at times to finally allow him some inner peace. Watching his struggle to the very end until he took his very last breath, knowing that he was surrounded by family who sang/talked to him until that very last moment…..is another reason I walk.

Though I am so grateful we all had each other – there is still so much more to be discovered to help those who suffer with the illness and their families who have to endure along the way.

Help Pam by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

                

Learning Never Stops: Comfort Care Homes Caregivers Ongoing Education

Thursday, September 7th, 2017 1:18:37 PM
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ComfortCare Homes caregivers receive comprehensive senior care training in Wichita, KS

The decision to bring a caregiver into your home or have a senior parent move into an assisted living facility is a challenging task. For families with loved ones suffering from memory illnesses like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, there are many factors to consider. You want your senior loved one to feel comfortable, supported, safe and happy. Caregivers should be friendly, highly-skilled, and educated in the specialized care needs of seniors with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Why Continuing Education is Important

At Comfort Care Homes, we understand that you and your family want the best care for your senior loved one. While continuing education has been standard practice for our caregivers since the beginning, this year we began a new comprehensive training plan.

Comfort Care Homes partnered with local career training, employee assistance, and senior service organizations to create on-going education opportunities for caregivers. Our staff began this training in August and will continue to develop their skills in the coming year. Not only does improved continuing education enhance care for our Residents, it also shows that we support and believe in our caregiving staff.

Our Training Partners

Advancements in Alzheimer’s and dementia care continue to be made as medical professionals learn more about the signs, symptoms, and triggers of the diseases. Comfort Care Homes provide senior care specifically for those adults with memory care needs. We work with many local and national organizations to ensure our staff is up to date on the latest Alzheimer’s and dementia care techniques.

In August 2017, our staff had the opportunity to learn from a variety of local organizations. The training completed by our care staff surpasses the requirements and expectation of their state certification requirements.

Three of these partners included Allied Health Career Training, LLC, EMPAC, and Senior Care Pharmacy. Each of these groups offers information and resources for our caregivers in Wichita, KS. Our partners presented information and training sessions to our staff, but these organizations can potentially benefit the families of our clients as well.

Visit our Family Resources center to learn more about the support and literature available to family caregivers. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about memory care in Wichita, KS.

Allied Health Career Training, LLC

Allied Health Career Training, LLC is a company that strives to enhance learning through dementia training, cultural change, and person-centered care. They offer classes at local facilities to provide the training that a staff of caregivers need.

EMPAC Employee Assistance Programs

EMPAC provides individualized resources and training for employees. Their services have a positive impact on employees, their families, and overall company morale. EMPAC helps employees expand their capabilities and perform the best they can.

Senior Care Pharmacy

Senior Care Pharmacy is a locally owned operation that aims to improve convenience for long-term care, assisted living facilities, patients, and their families. They present how their services and methods can be implemented to improve you or a loved one’s care.

Trusting Our Team of Caregivers

Comfort Care Homes believes in the ability and potential of our staff.  The care training completed by our staff exceeds the expectations and requirements of their state certification. We have seen their successes and invest in their continued growth. On-going education improves the lives of our caregivers and our Residents.

Going above and beyond what is required helps ensure that our care staff provides the best, most effective, and kindest care to your senior loved one. Comfort Care Homes is a real home for Residents with memory care needs. We strive to make sure they receive the comforts, attention, and expert care they deserve.

For more information about our caregiver training or senior care services provided by Comfort Care Homes, please call our office at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website: http://comfortcarehomeswichita.com/

Why I Walk – Stacie Grimes

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017 12:25:17 PM
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As a CareGiver participating in the Walk, I am representing my Residents, their family members, and all other CareGivers.

Being in this position, I see all sides of the spectrum. I see the family members and the tears of frustration and sadness they cry for their mother, father, sister, brother, or grandparent who no longer knows them.

I also see the Resident who struggles to express what they are feeling or who is confused as to who the person sitting next to them is, even if it is their wife or child.

I am praying that with the money raised in this Walk and others that we will find a cure! Please consider donating or joining our team and making a difference.

Help Stacie by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

How Hospice and Comfort Care Support Spouses of Seniors With Dementia

Thursday, August 31st, 2017 7:05:55 PM
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Comfort care provides more than physical assistance: companionship, emotional support, and understanding

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease lay a heavy burden not only on the senior suffering from the condition but on their family caregivers, children and spouses too. As the disease progresses, dementia brings on new sets of challenges and obstacles. Many family members find themselves in the role of caregiver, taking on responsibilities that change their relationship as a daughter, son, husband, or wife. In the late stages of dementia, it often becomes necessary to bring in professional comfort care or hospice care. While these services are essential to the physical comfort of seniors, comfort and hospice care providers can also offer precious emotional support and companionship for spouses and loved ones.

Challenges Faced by Family Members

Family members, especially adult children and spouses, often suddenly find themselves taking on the role of caregiver for loved ones with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Providing adequate care for a person whose memory is deteriorating can be incredibly difficult. Many family caregivers have no formal training or experience in caregiving. Watching a spouse or any other loved one struggle without being able to do anything about it can be frustrating.

For the spouses of dementia patients, the hardship of caregiving adds an unfamiliar facet to their relationship. A husband or wife may feel like they have failed their spouse if they are unable to provide adequate care on their own. Additionally, as their loved one’s condition worsens, they may become unrecognizable to their spouse. It is devastating for someone with whom you have spent years of your life with to see you as a stranger or even a threat. Dementia causes spouses to lose pieces of their loved one slowly, sometimes over many years, until the person they knew seems to no longer exist.

For these and many more reasons, spouses and family caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease often experience feelings of isolation, helplessness, and depression. When hospice or comfort care providers are brought into the situation, they provide much-needed assistance with providing care, companionship, spiritual guidance and grief support.

How Comfort Care Helps Spouses and Family

Hospice and comfort caregivers are uniquely trained to provide more than physical, personal care for seniors with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Today’s hospice care is considered to be the model for compassionate care for people facing a life-limiting illness such as Alzheimer’s disease. [Source: Huffington Post]

For family caregivers, comfort care providers offer a helping hand, easing the burden of being the primary caregiver for a parent, sibling, grandparent, or other loved one. While a caregiver takes over the majority of responsibilities, you will have the opportunity to sort through your own emotions and feelings. Dementia can be like losing a loved one in slow motion and the disease changes your relationship to one another. It is okay to grieve over this loss. Allow yourself to focus on the time you have with your loved one while a trained care provider ensures their comfort and well-being.

For spouses, hospice or comfort care provides support immediately. Professionals can provide a compassionate, listening ear and offer factual information. Despite practical matters, a comfort care provider can offer advice and companionship based on experience. They can help a husband or wife understand the realities of the situation and offer strategies for dealing with stress, depression, anger, and grief. Comfort bereavement can also be continued after the passing of a spouse, with care providers checking in periodically.

Finding the Resources and Help You Need

Unique challenges are present for family members as their loved one moved through the different stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia. You may find that you need assistance providing adequate care for a loved one. There are a variety of types of care assistance, from adult day can and part-time care to assisted living and 24-hour comfort care.

Educate yourself on the options available to you and your family. If your loved one is able, talk to them about which options they feel comfortable with. If they are no longer able to make these types of decisions on their own, know that you have resources and support available to you. Comfort care professionals can help you understand your options and make the best care decision for you and your family.

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia and how comfort care can help, please call ComfortCare Home of Wichita at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website by clicking here.

Why I Walk – Brooke Bowlin

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017 10:00:40 AM
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I can vividly remember the amazing breakfast my great grandma Oakley would make me when I spent the night. Eggs, bacon, juice, and sugary cereal, that I only got when we stayed at our grandparents. No matter what I asked for she would be delighted to make it. I was always overly stuffed when I ate at great grandmas house.

The Easters with our family where everyone was searching for their special plastic Easter egg, that would surely have a one dollar bill, were some of my earliest Easter memories. As my grandma’s Alzheimer’s progressed I would spend my weekends with my grandpa visiting my great grandma. Mowing the lawn, sweeping the grass off the sidewalk, and chasing the crows from the bird bath are memories I hold dear.

At the time I didn’t understand why my grandma thought I was my mom, but it didn’t matter, I loved spending time with her. Now, almost 20 years later, the impact my great-grandma Oakley had on me is still evident in my everyday life.

Each year as the Walk to End Alzheimer’s is in full swing we are all reminded that no one should ever walk alone. I am comforted to know my grandma and our family didn’t have to walk this journey alone. The love, compassion, and dedication my family had for my grandma were always evident.

Through this journey, I got to learn what unconditional love and support was all about. That love has helped turned me into the daughter, wife, mother, aunt, granddaughter, and person I am today.

My grandmother, and my families love for her, continue to inspire me throughout my adult life. It has given me a passion to help others as they walk through this journey.

So this year I walk to honor great-grandma Oakley and our family. I walk for all those that I meet, on a daily basis, who are on this journey. I hope for a cure to be found, but until that day comes, I walk to remind each person on this journey that they are not alone. I walk to share the love and support with them that I learned from my own families experiences.

Help Brooke by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

Early-onset Alzheimer’s Symptoms: Know the Signs and Find the Help You Need

Thursday, August 24th, 2017 8:24:32 PM
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Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are not new illnesses. Before the findings of modern medicine, Alzheimer’s patients were often misdiagnosed as senile and memory loss was just an unfortunate symptom of aging. Today we know more than ever about dementia and Alzheimer’s symptoms and continued research works to find the cause and cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

A specific type of Alzheimer’s, known as Early-onset or Younger Alzheimer’s affects adults under the age of 65. Typically, adults with early-onset will display Alzheimer’s symptoms in their 40s and 50s. Their disease typically goes either unnoticed or misdiagnosed by primary physicians, who attribute symptoms to stress or other neurological factors. Dementia may be common among elderly adults, but younger adults are at risk as well.

What is Early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is split into three general stages: early stage, middle stage, and late stage. The disease affects each person differently in each stage and the symptoms vary. Alzheimer’s typically progresses slowly over time in adults over the age of 65. What makes early-onset dementia unique is that it occurs in younger adults.

Doctors do not know why early-onset Alzheimer’s symptoms appear in such young brains. There have been studies that indicate several genetic mutations that directly cause Alzheimer’s. For this reason, early-onset Alzheimer’s is often referred to as “familial dementia.” These genes account for 60-70% of early-onset Alzheimer’s cases.

[http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/alzheimers/art-20048356?pg=1]

Genetic testing for these mutations is available, but talking extensively with a doctor is recommended as a good first step. Getting an accurate diagnosis for early-onset Alzheimer’s can be difficult and require many neurological exams, brain mapping, and extensive tests. If you suspect you or a loved one are experiencing early-onset Alzheimer’s symptoms below, consult with a medical professional immediately.

What are Early-onset Alzheimer’s Symptoms?

Alzheimer’s symptoms focus on memory loss that disrupts daily life. This can include challenges in planning or solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks at home or work, misplacing things, and changes in mood and personality.

[http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_early_onset.asp]

Early-onset Alzheimer’s symptoms typically introduce new problems at work or at home for younger adults. Talking with a doctor is essential to determining the true cause of these symptoms and whether or not they are related to early dementia.

There are some major differences between forgetfulness and dementia. Read our “Forgetfulness vs. Alzheimer’s of Dementia” to learn more!

How to Plan for the Future

If you have been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s, know that you are never alone. Below are some steps suggested by the Alzheimer’s Association for coping after a diagnosis:

  1. Educate Yourself on the Impact of the Disease on Your Life

Early-onset Alzheimer’s and dementia will inevitably have an impact on your life as a spouse, parent, and employee. It is normal to grief over anticipated changes. Taking care of your emotional and physical needs is essential. Educating yourself as much as possible about your disease and utilizing support groups can help your entire family move forward after a diagnosis.

  1. Make Plans for Your Financial Future

Many times, early-onset dementia impacts a young adult’s ability to work. Talking with your employer about the limitations of your disease is important. You should be open and honest about how you see your professional future fitting into your disease. Your employer may offer benefits such as disability insurable, early retirement, family and medical leave, and other health insurance benefits. View a detailed brochure about financial and health care benefits for Alzheimer’s patients here: https://www.alz.org/i-have-alz/if-you-have-younger-onset-alzheimers.asp

  1. Plan for Future Care

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, you are able to put critical plans into place. This can include the type of care you want to receive in the later stages of Alzheimer’s. Talk to your doctor about participating in a research study. Explore long term care options and assisted living facilities in your area. While it will no doubt be difficult, choosing how you want to spend your life with Alzheimer’s will make coping with the disease manageable for you and your family.

  1. Live Well

Early-onset Alzheimer’s presents a variety of unexpected challenges. The silver lining lies in your choice of how to live. Take care of yourself by maintaining your physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health. Find activities or professionals that help you reduce stress. Taking each day as it comes is important to coping with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Download the Alzheimer’s Association’s brochure on younger-onset Alzheimer’s Disease here.

 

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia and how specialized care can help, please call ComfortCare Home of Wichita at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website by clicking here.

Why I Walk – Robert Miller

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017 1:30:00 PM
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My maternal grandparents were like magical creatures. They were the amazement of Christmas. They showed up for all my choir events. They coddled and comforted me when I was down or not feeling well. They were present.

And through it all, my grandfather, Alfred Smart, was a rock. He was my hero. He was a positive male role model. And I was his “little buddy.”

I miss hearing him call me that.

I was fortunate to be an adult as he aged and to know him well. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s with dementia and he seemed to decline quickly. But through it all, I continued to be his little buddy. And I stood next to him to the last days of his life. Our entire family did.

He inspires me today. I walk for him.

Help  Robert by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

Caregiver Tips: Calming a Confused Senior with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

Friday, August 18th, 2017 2:32:30 PM
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Ease stress and frustration through assisted living techniques

For seniors in the early stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss is common. While the rest of their cognitive abilities may still be strong, remembering names, places, and words become difficult. They may become frustrated at this new-found confusion, agitated that they are unable to recall familiar things. As their disease progresses seniors with dementia will have increased confusion, leading to agitation, panic, and even aggression.

As a family member or primary caregiver for a person with severe memory loss, these episodes of confusion can be alarming. Seeing a loved one frightened by newly unfamiliar surroundings is heartbreaking. If you find yourself wishing you could do more to calm and console your loved one, there are support and resources available. Assisted living professionals who interact with and care for residents with severe dementia and Alzheimer’s have advice for family members and loved ones of seniors with dementia.

What causes agitation in dementia and Alzheimer’s patients?

Dementia is a progressive disease and over time it causes brain cells to deteriorate. It is this deterioration that dementia symptoms including memory loss, confusion, agitation, restlessness, and fatigue. Because there is not yet a cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, there is nothing that can be done to stop or reverse this deterioration.

However, environmental factors can exacerbate their symptoms. Being aware of your loved one’s surroundings, daily routine, preferences, and triggers can help you maintain a comforting environment for them. Change is a major cause of confusion and agitation in dementia patients. Their world is becoming increasingly unfamiliar to them and seemingly small changes can disrupt the comfort of their daily routine.

Common environmental changes that affect behavior include:

– Being suddenly admitted to a hospital or assisted living facility

– Changes in scheduled caregiving

– New visitors or too many people visiting at once

– Confrontation or perceived threats                     [Source]

Tips to Prevent Confusion

While you can try to monitor the daily situations and interactions your loved one faces, ultimately you cannot control the world around them. Accidents and emergencies happen. Being prepared to respond, console and care for a confused senior is the best way to support their well-being.

Assisted living professionals offer the following tips to family members seeking to prevent confusion and agitation:

Create a calm environment

Being overstimulated by loud talking, commotion, and unfamiliar faces causes stress for seniors with dementia. Having a quiet space that is comfortable can provide refuge to an overwhelmed loved one. Comfort objects such as blankets or clothing items can provide a distraction and added security.

Monitor personal comfort and any additional symptoms

Make sure your loved one has taken their medications properly. Ensuring that they have eaten, had enough water to drink, and received adequate sleep is also important. Being vigilant about personal care can help seniors with dementia be more comfortable.

Avoid surprises and sudden changes in routine when possible.

We have learned that change is a major cause of confusion and agitation for seniors with dementia. As your loved one’s illness progresses, there may come a time when they need professional care. Before moving your loved one into an assisted living facility, consider part-time care or adult day care options. If these options are introduced in the early stages of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, your loved one has the opportunity to familiarize themselves with caregivers and become comfortable in surroundings outside the home.

For more information about adult day can as a transition into full-time assisted living, read our “Why Adult Day Care is Important” article.

How to Respond to A Confused Senior

Even if you do everything within your power to provide a comfortable, safe environment for your loved one, the nature of the disease makes confusion and agitation inevitable. Know that you are not responsible and that help is available for you both.

Follow these 4 Steps to Responding to a Confused Senior with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease:

  1. Listen to frustrations – Validate their emotions and sympathize with their situation.
  2. Provide reassurance – Although you may not understand, provide comfort and reassurance. Trying to reason with a confused senior may not be affective because their brain simply doesn’t process information the way a healthy brain would. Make sure they know they are safe and that you support them.
  3. Modify the situation – If they seem agitated by loud sounds, try moving to a quiet area. In overwhelming situations filled with new faces or places, distraction can be helpful. Give your loved on a task to focus on, something simple like folding towels, buttoning a sweater, or completing a puzzle. Occupying their mind with something other than confusion can ease behavioral symptoms.
  4. Share your experience – Speaking with your loved one medical professional or assisted living care providers is essential. These specialists will be able to alter medications or therapy plans and provide advice on how to respond in the future. [Source]

Know Where to Find Help

As your loved one’s disease progresses, you may need additional support and help providing adequate memory care. Preparing for this reality in advance is beneficial to both you and your senior loved one. Trained assisted living professionals are able to meet the unique needs of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients.

To learn more about memory care and how specialized care can help, please call ComfortCare Home of Wichita at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website by clicking here.

Additional Resources

Anxiety and Agitation – Alz.org

Treatments for Behavior – Alz.org

Dementia Care Relaxation Techniques & Therapies

Why I Walk – Kasey Briedenthal

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017 12:20:08 PM
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I walk for many reasons. I walk for my maternal grandma, paternal grandpa and great grandparents who had dementia and Alzheimer’s.

I walk for my paternal grandma who is living with end stages of dementia and Parkinson’s disease. I walk for my mother-in-law who is battling early-onset dementia at the age of 65.

I walk for my family, friends, children and husband who I hope are never afflicted with the disease. I walk for the wonderful residents and families that I serve at ComfortCare Homes.

I have watched this terrible disease steal the memories, personality, and identity of many people close to me. Unfortunately, there will be many more in my lifetime.

I pray that with the donations raised at the Walk to END Alzheimer’s we will get one step closer to a cure or at minimum better treatments.

Help Kasey by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

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Testimonials

I cannot say enough good things about Maurita & Susan (CareGivers) at 219.  They are always caring & cheerful & positive.  They have gone out of their way (I feel above & beyond) to help my aunt adjust to her new home.  They call me at the first sign of any concerns or changes in my aunt.  They treat her as part of their family.  I am very grateful every day that my aunt is in their care.  It is comforting to know she is where she belongs.  I feel like they are a great team!

- Carla Barnard

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