(316) 444-0532

ComfortCare Homes Wichita Blog

Speaker Spotlight: Kim Campbell and CareLiving

Thursday, October 12th, 2017 7:23:30 AM
Categorized In

An inspiring, honest presentation for those impacted by Alzheimer’s or dementia

Coming up on November 2nd, the 6th Annual Kansas Education Conference on Dementia will feature a variety of educational breakout sessions and presentations. There will be two keynote speakers, Vallerie Gleason and Kim Campbell, each using their unique journeys and experiences with Alzheimer’s disease to educate participants.

This event is open to the public and medical professionals, nurses, administrators, adult home care operators, family members, caregivers, and adults in the early stages of Alzheimer’s or dementia are encouraged to attend.

Want to learn more about this year’s Kansas Education Conference on Dementia? Read our blog, with complete event details and registration by clicking here!

Get to Know Kim Campbell

Kim Campbell was married to legendary country music star Glen Campbell for 25 years. Glenn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2011. After his diagnosis, Glenn and his family decided to share their battle with the disease with film makers. The documentary “Glenn Campbell: I’ll Be Me” follows Kim, Glenn, and their 3 adult children on Glenn’s Goodbye Tour. [Source]

Kim remained by Glenn’s side throughout the entire tour, being a caregiver for Glenn and watching as Alzheimer’s changed her family’s life forever. In August of 2017, Glenn passed away. During her time as her husband’s caregiver and since his passing, Kim has dedicated herself to educating people about Alzheimer’s disease and the role of caregivers.

In her lifestyle and social movement guide CareLiving.org, Kim strives to improve the quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s or dementia and their caregivers. She is an advocate for self-care and, based on personal experience, offers honest advice for caregivers of all types. Kim knows the importance of caring for yourself while caring for others, in particular a spouse or parent with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Kim has received many awards and accolades for her contributions to the Alzheimer’s research and caregiver communities. She has been named an honorary faculty member of the University of Maryland Baltimore, providing an essential connection between a leading research university and the practical experience of senior service leaders across the nation. [Source]

Resources for Alzheimer’s or Dementia Caregivers

The 6th Annual Kansas Education Conference on  Dementia is open to caregivers, family members, and those with dementia. The devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease can impact everyone in the family, not just the spouse or partner. Insights from conference speakers like Kim Campbell can offer unique insights and tips.

If you are not sure the conference is for you, don’t worry. ComfortCare Homes will be posting weekly blogs and recaps of conference events. Simply check back with the “Alzheimer’s Care Updates” to receive weekly articles and resources.

If you are the primary caregiver for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia and are searching for help, consider ComfortCare Homes of Wichita, KS. ComfortCare Homes offers a variety of memory care services for seniors in a residential setting. Truly a home experience, CareGivers care for Residents as if they are a member of their own families.

For more information about our caregiver training or senior care services provided by Comfort Care Homes, please call our office at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website: http://comfortcarehomeswichita.com/

Why I Walk – Jessica Dean

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 5:28:14 PM
Categorized In

Jessica is a nurse at Founders Crest. She frequently works with our Residents and their families. Here’s her story:

I was only 10 years old when I received, what I believe now to be, my calling. My Great-grandfather had just passed away and we gathered at a Relative’s home following his service. My Great-grandmother was relentlessly searching for him in every room. She would yell out for him and then tell me, “I know Ed is around here somewhere.” Moments after this repetitive statement you would hear a harsh voice, coming from a distance, shout, “He passed away, Juanita. We just went to his funeral earlier today! Don’t you remember?”

I saw her face change with every “reminder” while she grabbed her chest and gasped, as if it was the first time she had been told. I knew at that moment, at 10 years old, that we were doing her a grave injustice. It was the pivotal moment that I realized this disease, Alzheimer’s, was a taboo.

I knew my family wanted to do right by Juanita but were never equipped with the resources needed to do so. It was because of this that we missed out on our own memories with her.

As time went on my Great Grandmother was bounced around from care home to care home. She was a great escape artist who also had “behaviors” commonly associated with her disease, but few places were equipped to meet her needs.

Years later, after her passing, I remember feeling a void. Only remembering the shell of who my Great-grandmother really was. I knew that THIS is not the way things should be.

Because of these events, I walk. I walk for every Resident I have cared for, for every family who has ever endured this long good bye. I walk to end the taboo associated with Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. I walk to bring awareness. I walk to END Alzheimer’s.

“Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world.”

Help Jessica by making a donation to the Comfort Crusaders Team – Click here to make a donation.

For more information about The Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how you can get involved, please visit our event page here. If you have any questions, feel free to call our office at 316-267-7333.

Caregiver Tips: Calming a Confused Senior with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

Friday, August 18th, 2017 2:32:30 PM
Categorized In

Ease stress and frustration through assisted living techniques

For seniors in the early stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss is common. While the rest of their cognitive abilities may still be strong, remembering names, places, and words become difficult. They may become frustrated at this new-found confusion, agitated that they are unable to recall familiar things. As their disease progresses seniors with dementia will have increased confusion, leading to agitation, panic, and even aggression.

As a family member or primary caregiver for a person with severe memory loss, these episodes of confusion can be alarming. Seeing a loved one frightened by newly unfamiliar surroundings is heartbreaking. If you find yourself wishing you could do more to calm and console your loved one, there are support and resources available. Assisted living professionals who interact with and care for residents with severe dementia and Alzheimer’s have advice for family members and loved ones of seniors with dementia.

What causes agitation in dementia and Alzheimer’s patients?

Dementia is a progressive disease and over time it causes brain cells to deteriorate. It is this deterioration that dementia symptoms including memory loss, confusion, agitation, restlessness, and fatigue. Because there is not yet a cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, there is nothing that can be done to stop or reverse this deterioration.

However, environmental factors can exacerbate their symptoms. Being aware of your loved one’s surroundings, daily routine, preferences, and triggers can help you maintain a comforting environment for them. Change is a major cause of confusion and agitation in dementia patients. Their world is becoming increasingly unfamiliar to them and seemingly small changes can disrupt the comfort of their daily routine.

Common environmental changes that affect behavior include:

– Being suddenly admitted to a hospital or assisted living facility

– Changes in scheduled caregiving

– New visitors or too many people visiting at once

– Confrontation or perceived threats                     [Source]

Tips to Prevent Confusion

While you can try to monitor the daily situations and interactions your loved one faces, ultimately you cannot control the world around them. Accidents and emergencies happen. Being prepared to respond, console and care for a confused senior is the best way to support their well-being.

Assisted living professionals offer the following tips to family members seeking to prevent confusion and agitation:

Create a calm environment

Being overstimulated by loud talking, commotion, and unfamiliar faces causes stress for seniors with dementia. Having a quiet space that is comfortable can provide refuge to an overwhelmed loved one. Comfort objects such as blankets or clothing items can provide a distraction and added security.

Monitor personal comfort and any additional symptoms

Make sure your loved one has taken their medications properly. Ensuring that they have eaten, had enough water to drink, and received adequate sleep is also important. Being vigilant about personal care can help seniors with dementia be more comfortable.

Avoid surprises and sudden changes in routine when possible.

We have learned that change is a major cause of confusion and agitation for seniors with dementia. As your loved one’s illness progresses, there may come a time when they need professional care. Before moving your loved one into an assisted living facility, consider part-time care or adult day care options. If these options are introduced in the early stages of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, your loved one has the opportunity to familiarize themselves with caregivers and become comfortable in surroundings outside the home.

For more information about adult day can as a transition into full-time assisted living, read our “Why Adult Day Care is Important” article.

How to Respond to A Confused Senior

Even if you do everything within your power to provide a comfortable, safe environment for your loved one, the nature of the disease makes confusion and agitation inevitable. Know that you are not responsible and that help is available for you both.

Follow these 4 Steps to Responding to a Confused Senior with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease:

  1. Listen to frustrations – Validate their emotions and sympathize with their situation.
  2. Provide reassurance – Although you may not understand, provide comfort and reassurance. Trying to reason with a confused senior may not be affective because their brain simply doesn’t process information the way a healthy brain would. Make sure they know they are safe and that you support them.
  3. Modify the situation – If they seem agitated by loud sounds, try moving to a quiet area. In overwhelming situations filled with new faces or places, distraction can be helpful. Give your loved on a task to focus on, something simple like folding towels, buttoning a sweater, or completing a puzzle. Occupying their mind with something other than confusion can ease behavioral symptoms.
  4. Share your experience – Speaking with your loved one medical professional or assisted living care providers is essential. These specialists will be able to alter medications or therapy plans and provide advice on how to respond in the future. [Source]

Know Where to Find Help

As your loved one’s disease progresses, you may need additional support and help providing adequate memory care. Preparing for this reality in advance is beneficial to both you and your senior loved one. Trained assisted living professionals are able to meet the unique needs of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients.

To learn more about memory care and how specialized care can help, please call ComfortCare Home of Wichita at (316) 444-0532 or visit our website by clicking here.

Additional Resources

Anxiety and Agitation – Alz.org

Treatments for Behavior – Alz.org

Dementia Care Relaxation Techniques & Therapies

Testimonials

“The family gratefully acknowledges and thanks ComfortCare Homes in Wichita for the excellent care they gave Margaret the past two years.  They treated all of us with such love and respect.  Alzheimer’s Disease truly is the ‘long goodbye.’ “

- Barber Family, in the Wichita Eagle.

Read more...

News

Oct
14
It’s never too early to plan for business succession
The following excerpt of an article in the Wichita Business Journal was published on line Oct 6, 2017 By Bryan Horwath  –  Reporter, Wichita Businread more
Apr
15
Comfort Care Home’s $2.6M advanced dementia-care facility to open
Wichita Business Journal By Josh Heck Comfort Care Homes will open its new care center for people with advanced stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia nread more
Oct
23
Old, local home gets new meaning (Ottawa, KS)
Ottawa Area Chamber of Commerce Newsletter Imagine the fear when an aging loved one wanders away from home or leaves the kitchen with something still read more

More News>>

Gallery

View All Galleries>>